Gunsmith to the Stars – a book involving Stembridge Gun Rentals

Cory Zamora was kind enough to let me know that her book: Gunsmith to the Stars will be released next month. We have had several articles about her Father, Manuel Zamora, who worked for Stembridge Gun Rentals in the early days. I hope to get a copy, and learn a little more about a somewhat connected history. Here’s the link via Amazon

book

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Manuel Zamora of Stembridge Gun Rentals

The photo above is Manuel Zamora of Stembridge Gun Rentals demonstrating a gun designed for Howard Hughes.

Manuel Zamora with Stewart Granger in 1952 looking over weapons for the film “The Prisoner of Zenda

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Even more Stembridge Gun Rentals History!

A gentleman by the name of Jim Ferguson wrote me last year:

“I was cleaning out a home today and found a box of letters and photos dated in the 1940’s. They were letters to a Frederick T. Dickie at Stembridge gun rentals at Paramount Studios in Hollywood. The photos were of lots of neat guns and of some people whom I asume are related to the gun shop. I guess I’m wondering if anyone is interested in seeing this stuff.”

I wrote back of course, and said yes! Here’s what Jim found!

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a little more Stembridge Gun Rentals History

SHORTLY AFTER THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR, James Stembridge left his East Coast home and went to Los Angeles to seek his fortune. Somewhere around 1913 he met up with Cecil B. DeMille and landed a job helping him make a war movie. Mr. DeMille wanted James to coach the actors on how to act like soldiers and emulate their habits. This led to some steady work and sometime between 1916 and 1920 they recognized the need to accumulate a stock of firearms that could be used as movie props. Thus was the beginning of the Stembridge gun arsenal.

Over the years, James continued looking for and purchasing guns of all make and style and he became the leading armorer for the movie industry. Even though they rented firearms to all the studios, Stembridge Gun Rental was housed in a secure warehouse on the Paramount lot until 1979. The backbone of the business was its manager Fritz Dickie, who reigned from 1927 until 1974.

On Dec. 7, 1941, with the attack on Pearl Harbor underway, there was an immediate shoring up of the coastal defenses. On that same day the commander of Ft. MacArthur in Los Angeles called Stembridge and told him that he didnt think there were enough firearms at the fort. Stembridge immediately sent over several hundred rifles and more than 50 Thompson sub-machine guns.

Amazingly, when the war was over, all of the weapons were returned. Can you imagine a government agency being that reliable today? Stembridges contacts with the War Dept. paid off because with demobilization came the disposal of thousands of military firearms and Stembridge acquired enough to stock a movie army at scrap-metal prices.

By the 1980s, Stembridge had more than 10,000 guns in their armory. Unfortunately, the settlement of a family estate forced the sale of 400 of their historic guns, those used by legendary actors. Publishing magnate Robert Petersen bought them for his personal collection. Now his estate is auctioning them as noted in the article preceding this one.

The Stembridge Gun Rental is still in business and is operated by Syd Stembridge, grand-nephew of the founder. But times have changed. Many studios are using model guns now that can fire blanks designed to give a cinematic flash. Providing customized blank cartridges has long been a big facet of Stembridges business.

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Most of this information was provided to Firegeezer in a personal interview with Syd Stembridge.

 

(article from Bill Schumm’s website: http://firegeezer.com/2007/06/04/stembridge-gun-rental/#more-274/)

* Received some new items from Corlett Zamora this evening, who is looking for information on her Father, Manuel Zamora. Here’s a card that had her fathers name mentioned. If you have any information about Manuel Zamora, please leave a comment below so we can be in touch! Thanks!!!

 

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Interesting Stories

I just posted 2 stories (not written by me) that share a little more about Marion Wesley Stembridge, that shed a little more light on who he was, and what he did. There’s actually a story going on currently involving the house he lived in.

“Well, one of our past relatives, Marion Stembridge, is in the news again. No, not because his ghost has frightened off another interloper in Marion’s old house on Washington Street. The house has been reputed to have his ghost roaming the halls since his demise back in 1953 by his own hand after killing 2 of the attorneys who were trying to put him in jail for the killing of a woman who was trying to help defend John Cooper from Marion who was trying to get payment for a car he had sold Cooper. By the way, that house, I think, is for sale because all prospective buyers get run off by some unknown entity stomping through the house.” written by my Dad, Roger E. Stembridge

Here’s s picture my nephew Chad just sent of Marion’s Grave. The whole idea of ghosts used to really interest me. I view things much differently now, I know there is a very real spiritual war taking place. I do however believe that once you die, you enter either into heaven or hell – depending on the way you viewed Jesus Christ. This is the belief taught in the Bible; which I have excellent reason to believe is the Word of God!

What do you think?

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Marion Stembridge murders rocked 1950s Milledgeville

written by Jonathan Jackson
The Union-Recorder

September 05, 2008 09:42 pm

Peter Dexter won the National Book Award for fiction in 1988 for his novel “Paris Trout”. The book was later adapted into a screenplay, and a 1991 movie version starred Dennis Hopper and Barbara Hershey. The work of fiction, however, had roots in a Milledgeville tragedy that began unfolding almost 60 years ago.
Marion Stembridge was a Milledgeville businessmen who, in addition to selling groceries, made a living as a local loan shark. These transactions were reportedly often made between Stembridge and people who could ill-afford to pay back the loans. One of these loans turned deadly in 1949.
Stembridge made a loan to a man named John Cooper, who purchased a car. Cooper returned the car to Stembridge in an attempt to rid himself of the note. Stembridge and an employee named Sam Terry reportedly drove to an area of town called Shantytown and confronted Cooper.
According to published accounts, multiple sources record that Stembridge and Terry began beating Cooper and that two women intervened in the attack. Stembridge shot the two women, wounding both. One of the women, Emma Johnekin later died from her wounds, and Stembridge was charged.
Stembridge claimed he shot both women in self-defense. Still, he was sentenced to one to three years for the shooting. Stembridge appealed the sentence and was released on bond. He was represented by Marion Ennis, Frank Evans and Jimmy Watts.
According to published accounts, Ennis grew uncomfortable with the case and ended his legal representation of Stembridge. Stembridge was tried again and convicted, but was released again.
His former attorney, Marion Ennis, reportedly attempted to have him prosecuted yet again, but could not persuade authorities to do so. In the course of events, Ennis was assisted by another attorney, Pete Bivins, in trying to get Stembridge back into court.
Federal authorities learned and later successfully proved in court, that Stembridge had not paid federal taxes in several years. It was a widely held belief at the time that Ennis and Bivins uncovered evidence that resulted in Stembridges conviction on tax evasion charges. It was a belief that Stembridge himself also held.
On May 2, 1953, the City of Milledgeville was celebrating the 150th anniversary of its founding when Stembridge went to Ennis office above the Campus Theatre and shot him with a .38 caliber revolver, killing him.
Stembridge then went around the corner to Bivins office in the Sanford building and shot and killed him as well. Stembridge then killed himself with the gun.
Peter Dexter took liberties with actual events for his award-winning work of fiction, Paris Trout, but the man behind the account was most definitely Marion Stembridge.

Copyright 1999-2008 cnhi, inc.

Photos


The Campus Theatre sits in the shadow of the Baldwin County Courthouse in this October 2007 file photo. The upstairs offices are also the site of a famous Milledgeville murder. The Union-Recorder

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Milledgeville: A Real Page-Turner

article written by Carol Clark

Special to The Washington Post
Sunday, August 10, 2003; P01

“I was there the day Marion Stembridge came up the stairs, wearing that big coat with a pistol in his pocket.”

Bob Green, a 78-year-old lawyer, was telling me a story as I sat on a bench beneath a tulip tree in Milledgeville, Ga., waiting for the tourist trolley.

“I heard the shots from my office. The whole town was aflutter,” Green said, recalling the 1953 killing spree that became the basis for Pete Dexter’s prize-winning novel, “Paris Trout.”

Milledgeville, about 100 miles southeast of Atlanta, is a small town full of big stories. The comic and the tragic, the real and the unreal, the famous and the forgotten, all blend together in the rich local lore.

A young Oliver Hardy ran the projector at Milledgeville’s first movie house. “He sang and danced to entertain people between the picture shows,” said guide Gwendelyn Clark as the red trolley rolled along. “Then he left town, said he was going to make movies.”

We passed the cemetery where writer Flannery O’Connor is buried along with train robber Bill Miner — “the last of the Dalton gang” — and turned into a neighborhood of towering white oaks and white-columned mansions.

We stopped at the Gothic-style building that served as Georgia’s capitol during the Civil War, before the seat of government shifted to Atlanta, and the church where Gen. William Sherman’s troops stabled their horses when they marched through in 1864.

Milledgeville was founded in 1803, near the geographic heart of Georgia, and is the only planned capital in the country besides Washington. The compact town center contains more than 200 architectural landmarks, including many examples of a distinctive style known as Milledgeville Federal.

A bicentennial celebration has sparked efforts to attract more visitors. A new museum in the old state Capitol contains artifacts going back to the Creek Indians. The former Governor’s Mansion, where a ballroom scene for “Oldest Confederate Widow Tells All” was filmed, is undergoing renovation. Limited tours recently became available to Andalusia, the dairy farm on the edge of town where O’Connor did most of her writing.

So why has this middle Georgia gem, now marketing itself as the “Antebellum Capital,” remained off the tourism radar for so long?

For many native Georgians, Milledgeville is synonymous with five state prisons and Central State Hospital, once one of the world’s biggest — and most notorious — mental institutions. Generations of children grew up hearing: “If you don’t behave, I’m sending you to Milledgeville.” I had to pay it a visit.

“Turn right when you come to a little old restaurant and then you’ll see a pecan grove and the White House,” a liquor store clerk told me when I stopped to ask directions. “That’s the main building of the hospital, but everybody calls it the White House because that’s what it looks like.”

The mammoth Greek Revival administration building sat on a rise overlooking several acres of pecan trees, bordered by decaying red-brick structures that resembled abandoned schoolhouses, except for the rusted bars over the broken window panes.

Bud Merritt, a former psychiatric social worker who now serves as the hospital’s informal historian, met me inside the Victorian train depot that housed the museum.

A straitjacket was laid out on a gurney. A rolling medicine cart stood next to a metal bed with leather straps and sheets stenciled “state property.” Lobotomy tools were arranged in neat rows on a shelf. Below them was a vintage electric shock machine — a metal case with a Bakelite knob labeled “Intensity.”

When the hospital opened in 1842 as the Georgia Lunatic Asylum, it offered some of the best care available at that time for the mentally ill, Merritt said. Then it started growing, swelling to a small city of 13,000 patients by the 1960s. One or two staff members were assigned to as many as 100 patients.

“What you had here were a lot of decent, caring people working under extraordinarily difficult circumstances,” he said. “You’d just carve out a little area and do the best you could.”

Georgia has long since reformed and decentralized its mental health care system, like the rest of the nation. Central State now averages about 900 patients in its daily census.

We toured the grounds in Merritt’s van, entering an area where most of the former patient buildings have been turned into prison facilities. Loops of razor wire stacked five rows high lined both sides of the road until we entered a forest of cedar trees.

Between 1843 and the early 1900s, more than 20,000 patients who died in the hospital were brought to the forest and buried anonymously, according to a plaque.

The twitter of songbirds mingled with the distant shouts of prisoners in their exercise yards. I could see the faint outline of the unmarked graves — row after row of rectangular depressions in the forest floor.

“We’ve been getting a lot of inquiries now that there is less stigma attached to mental illness,” Merritt said. “Some people are finally learning that great-granddad didn’t die in the war, he died in Milledgeville.”

During lunch at Elaine’s restaurant, on the outskirts of downtown, police officers and farmers, elderly couples and young office workers filled the tables as a sturdy blonde weaved among them, carrying pitchers of iced tea that rattled like castanets. Every few minutes, the cooking staff burst through the kitchen’s swinging doors with trays radiating the aroma of hot biscuits.

The waitress addressed the diners by name as she poured their tea. When she got to me she asked, “You travelin’?”

I told her about my visit to Central State.

“I used to play at the hospital when I was a little girl,” she said. “My grandfather was the coroner and my grandmother was a caretaker. They’d take me along to work sometimes.”

“Weren’t you afraid?” I asked.

“Oh, no, I made a lot of friends,” she said. “I remember a woman who never talked to anyone. I went up to her and asked why she was sittin’ all alone and why she was so sad. And then she got to talkin’, and she talked from then on. I always tell people that I changed her life.”

Everybody I met in Milledgeville was a good storyteller.

Dianne Johnson, manager of the Antebellum Inn B&B, brought goose bumps to my arms when she told me about a ghost that was harassing a tenant in a nearby rental property.

“She was making the bed in the upstairs room when her 4-year-old daughter said, ‘Mama, make that man stop staring at me.’ She said, ‘What man, honey?’ And the little girl pointed to an empty corner of the room.”

Johnson assured me that the inn was ghost-free, then dashed off to a dinner engagement, leaving me alone in the elegant, but somewhat creaky, mansion.

I took a volume of O’Connor short stories from a bookshelf and sat on a rocker on the veranda. I hadn’t read “A Good Man Is Hard to Find” since college. I had forgotten how funny were O’Connor’s descriptions of a banal family from Atlanta, driving to Florida for vacation.

“Let’s go through Georgia fast so we don’t have to look at it much,” the bratty little boy says.

But the family turns off onto a side road. The narrative shifts from funny to terrifying when they find themselves at the mercy of an escaped felon known as the Misfit.

I snapped the book shut and called it a night.

Andalusia, the 544-acre farm where O’Connor drew her inspiration, is one of the last rural remnants amid the strip development lining the highway into Milledgeville.

Craig Amason, director of the Flannery O’Connor-Andalusia Foundation, met me in front of the two-story white farmhouse built around 1850. The house has been vacant since the author died in 1964 of the debilitating effects of lupus. She was 39.

We squished through mud notched by deer tracks as Amason told me about the foundation’s plans to renovate Andalusia and expand the regular visiting times. The farmhouse opened to the public for the first time in June. None of O’Connor’s famous peacocks remains on the property. The sole inhabitant of the farm, a mule named Flossie, eyed me suspiciously from a distance.

“This has the potential to become one of the most important literary landmarks in the country because it’s more than an author’s home. It’s also the source of her imagination,” Amason said. He gazed toward a rickety, weathered barn with a rusting tin roof. “Anyone who’s read ‘Good Country People’ can’t look at that hay barn and not think of Joy and the Bible salesman,” he said.

O’Connor was born in Savannah but moved to Milledgeville with her family when she was 13. Her two novels, “Wise Blood” and “The Violent Bear It Away,” and most of her short stories are set in the red-clay landscape of middle Georgia. Her characters spoke in the pitch-perfect cadences of the region’s farmers, housewives, laborers and aristocrats, making them seem real even when they veered off into extremes — which they often did. O’Connor used violence like flashes of lightning to expose her deeply spiritual themes.

An annual O’Connor symposium attracts hundreds of fans and scholars to Milledgeville, including many from Europe and Japan, Amason said. “She has a fanatical following. People either love her work or they hate it.”

He led me through the screened-in porch of the house and into the small room where O’Connor slept and worked. Dark blue curtains filtered the light. The air was suffused with the smell of old wood and textiles. The simple furnishings included empty bookcases and a twin bed covered in a thin cotton bedspread. An armoire stood in the center of the room, next to the bed.

“Flannery was on crutches, so it was an advantage to have everything pushed together,” Amason said. “She wrote every morning religiously, from 8 to 12, and she sat facing the back of this armoire so she wouldn’t be distracted.”

O’Connor, the most famous storyteller in a place weighted with stories, had her work cut out for her.

Carol Clark last wrote for Travel about Mobile, Ala.

Details: Milledgeville, Ga.

GETTING THERE: Milledgeville is about a 1 1/2-hour drive from Atlanta. Go east on I-20 about 60 miles to Exit 114 (Madison). Turn right onto Highway 441 south and continue about 45 miles to Milledgeville. Nonstop flights from D.C, to Atlanta start at about $235 round trip.WHERE TO STAY: The Antebellum Inn (200 N. Columbia St., 478-453-3993, www.antebelluminn.com), a five-room B&B, is a great place to soak up the ambience of Milledgeville. The 1890 mansion is in the heart of the historic district. Rates from $65 include a superb breakfast.

Milledgeville also has a number of chain hotels, including the Budget Inn (225 E. Hancock St., 478-452-3533), which has a convenient downtown location. Rooms go for about $35.

WHERE TO EAT: You won’t leave Elaine’s (1057 S. Wayne St.) hungry. This homey, no-frills restaurant has all-you-can-eat lunch and dinner buffets of fried chicken, quail, catfish and other local specialties for $6.50. Cafe South (132 Hardwick St.), housed in a historic building that was once a post office and general store, is another good place for southern comfort food. Meat-and-two- vegetable lunches served cafeteria-style are $6.15. Try the bread pudding.

WHAT TO DO:

Trolley tours of the town are offered Monday through Friday at 10 a.m. and Saturday at 2 p.m. by the Milledgeville-Baldwin County Convention and Visitors Bureau (see below). Cost of the two-hour tour, which includes a drive through the historic district as well as stops at historic homes, St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church and the Old State Capitol, is $10.

The museum at Central State Hospital (620 Broad St, 478-445-0755, www.centralstatehospital.org) is free but open by appointment only.

Flannery O’Connor’s farm, Andalusia, is open for self-guided, “walk-in” tours on Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., for $5 per person. Guided trolley tours depart from the visitors center the third Saturday of every month at 11 a.m. for $10. Other tours are offered by appointment. For directions and information: Flannery O’Connor-Andalusia Foundation, 478-454-4029, www.andalusiafarm.org.

The fifth Flannery O’Connor Symposium (478-445-5277, www.gcsu.edu/revelations), Oct. 8-11 at Georgia College and State University, features readings by poets and fiction writers, performances of original musical compositions, and area folk art exhibits. Ticket prices vary.

INFORMATION: Milledgeville-Baldwin County Convention and Visitors Bureau, 800-653-1804, www.milledgevillecvb.com.

— Carol Clark

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Total Eclipse in Georgia!

Tonight we watched a total eclipse, at about 10pm eastern standard time. There’s a good article by the citizen.com below on the eclipse. Enjoy learning!

eclipse.jpg

View the Total Lunar Eclipse of Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2008

Mon, 02/18/2008 – 9:52am

Georgians will have an opportunity, clouds allowing, to see a total eclipse of the Moon on Wednesday night, Feb. 20. The next total lunar eclipse visible from Georgia won’t occur until December 2010. For this month’s eclipse, members of the Flint River Astronomy Club will have their telescopes and binoculars set up for free views by the public. The site will be in front of the club’s usual meeting place, the Stuckey Building on the Griffin campus, University of Georgia, at 1109 Experiment Street. Telescopes will be set up at 8 p.m. to view the Moon, Saturn, and various stars, and the eclipse begins at 8:43 p.m.

Warm clothing is advised to enjoy this event. If you have a scope or binoculars, feel free to bring them.

Usually one or two lunar eclipses occur each year, although some are only partial eclipses. A lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth’s shadow, which can only occur at full Moon. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between the Earth and Sun, which can only occur at new Moon. Eclipses occur in pairs, about two weeks apart, either a lunar eclipse followed by solar, or a solar eclipse followed by lunar. This month, a solar eclipse occurred February 7th, but was only visible in the Southern Hemisphere.

Partial eclipse begins at 8:43 p.m., when the Moon begins entering Earth’s shadow, and totality, the point at which the Moon is completely within Earth’s shadow, begins at 10:01 p.m., and lasts until 10:51 p.m. The eclipse ends about midnight.

During totality, no direct sunlight shines on the Moon, but Earth’s atmosphere reflects some sunlight onto it. The result is that the Moon gets very dim, but never dark enough to be invisible.

The color of the Moon during an eclipse varies from year to year, and depends mostly on how much dust is in the atmosphere around the world. Large amounts of dust from volcanic eruptions or forest fires can cause the Moon to be a distinct reddish color. More common is a dull orange color.

The planet Saturn will be seen near the Moon, in the constellation Leo. Now is a good opportunity to view this fascinating planet through a telescope. The tilt of the rings is slowly diminishing so that in September 2009, we will be viewing the rings edge-on, and they will be nearly invisible from Earth.

Mars will also be high in the sky on Wednesday, in the constellation Taurus. It appears very small, but dark features should be just visible through the telescope.

For more information and directions, go to www.flintriverastronomy.org, or call the club’s president, Curt Cole, evenings at 770.946.3405. Information about eclipses can be found at http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/. Click on “Mr. eclipse.”

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Brrrrr!

January in the south is hit and miss with the cold weather, especially when you get a little further south. Moving here from metro Atlanta, we were surprised that the brief cold snaps were followed by warm days, sometimes going up in the 70s! Global warming….? I think it’s more of geographical location. Quite nice actually. We heat mostly by wood using a wood stove, and on some of those warmer days, you can actually go out and cut and split, and get things in order for th next “snap”

Narcissus Flowers blooming all around gives us a sign that Spring, is just around the corner! Walmart reinforces this with all the gardening stuff out as well… What’s the weather like where you are? When I see flowers like the one pictured here, it just amazes me that God created them, and cares for them, as well as those who follow Him!

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Merry Christmas from Waynesboro!

from our humble abode in the deep south, we would like to wish you a Merry Christmas. I’m sure everyone has great memories of relatives living in far away lands, and the looong drives there. As a child growing up in Athens, we used to make the drive to Hapeville to visit my Mom’s parents, and later my Dad’s Mom, Bonnie Stembridge. So many distant, yet very warm memories. I recently have been working on some old film footage that my brother Ed loaned me. It brings back so many memories. Here’s a clip of my Dad Roger E. stembridge pulling myself, and brothers Ed and James around on his old Sears Craftsman tractor (which still runs!) It even has an old rototiller attachment that my brother Mike recently took back to Atlanta, and sandblasted and painted it, and got it running again! My dad was pretty amazed, it hadn’t run for years. My brother Mike has a gift with mechanical things!

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Happy Thanksgiving!

Hope everyone has had a wonderful Thanksgiving. At home in Waynesboro, we had 4 families over to celebrate, and enjoy time together. There was a wonderful meal as well!We are all so thankful to our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, who gives us a reason to live! We are so excited about this great time of the year where we continue to teach our children what Christmas is really all about.

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Visitors

This evening, we had a couple of visitors walk down our street, to our home. They had visited once before. These young men were “elders” from the Church of Latter Day Saints, commonly known as Mormons. We had a nice visit, and they asked a little about our summer, and we were able to share the story of what had brought us to Waynesboro, and how God had called us into a different direction… Continue reading

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just whar is Waynesboro?

We live in what many folks refer to as “rural Georgia” but don’t let that fool ya! We are blessed beyond measure even in the small towns in Georgia.

Our town is referred to as the “Bird Dog Capitol of the World”; but then again, so is Union City, Alabama… I guess there are a number of bird dogs in our town, in fact we own a lab/weimaraner mix named Zoe.

zoe.jpg

Here’s a link for Union City Alabama’s website…

and the City of Waynesboro‘s website,

Check it out!

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2005 Homeschool memories


Homeschooling in Waynesboro, Georgia



Oh to be 5 at the beach!


Our recent trip to Tybee Island, just past Savannah, GA.
Dylan met some students from Savannah College of Art and Design doing a sandcastle workshop… and taught them a thing or two!

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the “Original” LINE

While the study of Genealogy is always interesting for me,
I realize that all roots trace back to the seed of Abraham; and ultimately
to the God of Abraham, Issac and Jacob.I understand there are many groups that use genealogy information for some very odd purposes. I hope the information on these pages will be helpful; but moreso, hope that you seek the truth in all things!If you are more interested in the ultimate original line, please visit Billy Graham’s website, or contact me directly!DeColores, and Blessings, David W. Stembridge

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Stembridge Gun Rentals

a collection from their PAST…

Stembridge Gun rentals of Hollywood, California, was formed in about 1920 by James Stembridge and Cecil B. DeMille to supply guns to the movie industry.
The company is still in existence and is currently being run by Syd Stembridge whose father was the nephew of the founder. (Contact information BELOW)


Make A Wish A few months back a friend of mine, Scott Hodges, was diagnosed with terminal cancer. Scott, a gun collector and enthusiast, had read with enthusiasm an article in GUNS Magazine, about Stembridge Gun Rental (Oct. ’98). He was hopeful that he could regain his health and make the trek to Southern California to tour the facility.I subsequently contacted Harry Lu at Stembridge. What happened next was truly amazing. Just two weeks before his death, Scott had the thrill of his life. With assistance from Hospice of the Valley, Harry Lu, along with his wife and three children, loaded an RV with his collection and drove to Phoenix..On a lovely Saturday afternoon, Scott and several of his fellow volunteers from the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Department,
were treated to a rare showing of weapons that have graced the silver screen. The day Scott spent with Harry Lu brought his family many happy memories they will always cherish.Chrystie HeimertPhoenix, Ariz.


A good resource for learning about how some of the Hollywood Blanks made by Stembridge Gun Rentals were used!

10007 .30-06 BY CHRIS PUNNETT – Superb reference for anyone interested in any type of cartridges. 384 pages, hardbound loaded with illustrations of cartridges, and boxes from makers all over the world. Great information including much historical data on the companies that made the cartridges. as well as details on the unbelievable number of variations that exist in this popular collecting specialty. Extensive coverage of U.S. military variations alone is worth the very modest price of this great book.
Title page autographed by the author.
FREE SHIPPING IN U.S.! $59.00
ORDER HERE!


If you would like information on a Stembridge Gun Rental Gun… or anything related to Stembridge Gun Rentals,Please write or call Sydney at the following:

also, here’s a neat article written by Bill Schumm about Stembridge Gun Rentals, and it’s history.


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Bridport, Dorset, England


picture from FreeFoto.com


Bridport, an Anglo-Saxon town made famous by its rope making is the largest town in West Dorset. Such was the fame of Bridport rope that those who ended their days on the gallows were said to have been ‘stabbed by a Bridport dagger’. The town is still Britain’s main source for twine.

The town grew up round the rope industry, which developed during the Middle Ages following King John’s request that the townsfolk make ‘night and day as many ropes for ships both large and small and as many cables as you can.’ Hemp and flax were grown locally and its long, straight alleys were once `rope walks where twine and rope were laid in long rope walks extending from the backs of houses as part of a cottage industry.

Bridport and the nearby harbour at West Bay, also dating from the 14th century, reached their peak of prosperity in the 18th and 19th century, corresponding with Britain’s sea power in the age of sail. Many of the houses which can be seen in South Street today were built during this period.

For more than 700 years Bridport has been at the forefront of net-making technology and among a number of local firms, the Bridport-Gundry group is today a world leader in the production of specialist textiles and nets. Bridport made nets are used by fishing fleets all over the world. Bridport-Gundry also make a whole range of other nets, including the arrester nets used by the Space Shuttle, equipment used by leading international airlines and those used at the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships

In the town centre a wide range of independent shops, including a number of Antique shops, are complemented by branches of national chains and supermarkets and there is a popular twice-weekly street market on Wednesdays and Saturdays. Historically interesting buildings include the Medieval parish church and chantry, the Tudor museum, and the Georgian town hall. The main streets have recently been remodeled and plans are in hand for a major development at West Bay and a light railway is proposed to link the “Bridport Harbour” with the main town.

Situated on the banks of the river, on the southern edge of the town is Britain’s only thatched brewery, Palmers of Bridport. Over two hundred years old, the brewery is very much the traditional, family-run business. The Palmer family took over the brewery in about its fiftieth year, and have been building up the business ever since. But the emphasis has always been on tradition – not only in their attitude towards the brewing process, but also towards their employees and the local community.

First impressions of the brewery, apart from the thatched roof on some of the older buildings, are of its well organized and beautifully functional equipment – lots of lovely Victorian brewing equipment and even a proper copper (they’re usually stainless steel these days). The brewery has always made the most of the river on whose banks it lies. In the past, the beer was transported to its destination by boat, though nowadays the river there is no longer navigable. Power for the brewery has been drawn from the river by means of a water wheel. That is, until a few years ago when the wheel’s huge cast iron shaft broke under the force of the river’s flow. Plans are afoot however to restore it to its former glory.

Here are some LINKs for Bridport, Dorset England:

Dorset County Council-Website

Tourist information on Bridport

Photographs of Bridport

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Crewkerne, Somerset, England

I received the recent note from Chris Ward – a cousin in Australia, and did a little digging on Crewkerne, and found the following (below) from 1850. There are quite a few Stembridges mentioned.

G’day David,

I don’t recall getting the message from Peter Hammett!! I haven’t established the STEMBRIDGE roots back in Bridport although undoubtedly they originated in Crewkerne in Somerset. I did find some reference to some old research done in the United States in the 1950s which suggested there were only two brothers but it was too difficult for me to pursue the story from this side of the world. I have recently seen a note that Kindness BREEDLOVE was born ca 1767 and died ca 1808 and married William STEMBRIDGE Jr. on January 22, 1785.

Chris

HUNT & CO.S 1850 DIRECTORY & TOPOGRAPHY OF THE TOWN OF CREWKERNE. in all places, where there are objects worthy of detail or observation, there should be a short printed Directory, for the use of the stranger. Dr.Johnson.

Is a parish and market town in the hundred of its name, which is derived from a Saxon word, signifying the Cottage on the Cross, it is 10 miles S.W. by S. from Ilchester and 132 W.S.W. from London.; within these last few years it is considerably improved, a handsome building, Stuckeys bank, a National School, and other new houses have been added, and more are in progress. It is a compact, well-built place, reposing in a valley, sheltered on all sides by verdant and richly cultivated hills; from these eminences the varied prospects that meet the eye are delightful and beautiful in the extreme; on Rana Hill, westward of Crewkerne, there formerly stood an ancient chapel, which contained the bones of St. Ranus; and at Haselbury, a celebrated recluse, named Wulfric, led a life of penance and great abstinence, inhabiting a small cave, and clothing himself in a raiment of finely wrought iron; he was visited by many distinguished personages of that time, amongst whom were Henry I. and Stephen. The church, which is cruciform, is of great beauty, its fine gothic proportions, with its elaborately wrought window-frames, and a handsome tower rising from the centre are beautifully detailed, part of the building is surrounded by lofty trees which add considerably to its effect;the living is a perpetual curacy in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Winchester; there are also chapels for Baptists and Wesleyans. A grammar-school is established here which is very ably conducted; the manufactures are principally girth web, hemp and tow spinning, and rope and twine making,which are carried on to a considerably extent, and employ a great number of hands, a literary and scientific institution has lately been established here with apparent benefit and success; The market-days are Saturdays, and there are great Spring markets for sheep, lambs, &c. in April and May; a fair is held annually on the first of September. In the neighbourhood of the town is Hinton House, the seat of the Earl Poulett, and near the church were formerly the remains of an abbey, but they have been lately removed and a modern building is now erected on its site. At the census taken in 1841, the population of Crewkerne amounted to 4414.

Post-office, East street. Post Master, John Budge. Letters are delivered daily, from London, Bristol, Birmingham, and the north, at 8 a.m. From Bridport, Beaminster and the East at 9 a.m. From Bridport and Beaminster, at 5 30 p.m.

Despatches for Bridport and Beaminster at 7 a.m.; for Bridport, Beaminster, and the east at 4 30 p.m., and for London, Bristol, Birmingham, and the north at 5 20 p.m. Box closes for Bridport, Beaminster, and the east at 4 20 p.m., and for London, Bristol, Birmingham, and the North at 4 40 p.m., but letters may be posted by affixing an additional stamp until within 5 minutes of the despatches.

Money Orders are granted and paid daily ( Sundays excepted ) from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Nobility, Gentry, & Clergy.

Ayre Rev. Joseph Watson, Parsonage
Baker Mrs. Rose, Abbey street
Berry William, Abbey street
Blanchard Miss, Gouldsbrook terr
Bridge John, Henley house
Burnard Mrs. Sheep market street
Caddle Rev. Henry, Wayford
Conron Miss, Sheep market street
Copp Mrs. Frances Maria, Gouldsbrook terrace
Cross Rev. Joseph, Merriott
Donesthorpe Mrs. East street
Dummett Wm. East street
Dummett Wm. H. Sheep market st
Dusantoy Rev. Fredk. Haselbury
Hoskins Rev. Hen. North Perrott
Hoskins Thos. Haselbury Plucknet
Hoskins Wm. North Perrott house
Hugill Rev. John, Church lane
Lowman Mrs. Clapton court
Newbury Rev. Thos. Hinton St. George
Palmer Mrs. Elizb. & Miss Elizb. Oxen lane
Palmer Mrs. Gouldsbrook terr
Pearce Rev. J.Standen, Chapel House
Penny Rev. Chas. Abbey street
Perkins Misses, Misterton house
Poulett Rt. Hon. Earl of, Hinton house
Sparks Isaac J. Rose cottage
Symes Rear Adm. Joseph, Sheep market street
Templeman Rev. Alex. Lopen

Auctioneers and Appraisers.

Patch John, Abbey street
Perry Henry, West street

Bakers.

Fry Thomas, West street
Gibbs Joseph, Sheep market street
Hitchcock James, Hermitage st
Mills Mary (& confectioner), Market place
Morton John, South street
Smith Charles (& cornfactor), Goulds square
Wilce John, South street

Banks.

Stuckeys Banking Company, Sheep market street; manager, Loveridge Chas. Warre;
draw upon Robarts, Curtis, and Co., London
Savings Bank, Sheep market st; agent, Young John

Basket Makers.

Holt Henry, North street
Webb John, Hermitage street

Beer Retailers.

Collard James, West street
Connock John, East street
Hurtnole John, Hermitage street
Osborn Samuel, West street
Palmer Joseph, South street
Parker Henry, Goulds square
Pitcher Charles, North street
Raison James, West street
Scriven William, West street
Webber William, Vinney bridge
Young Robt. South street

Blacksmiths.

Blake Chas. Wm. East street
Boufield Thomas, East street
Clift John, Abbey street
Collard James, West street
Davis Edwd. Sheep market street
Davis Henry, West street
Fry Thomas, West street
Hayward Giles, East street
Newbery James, Hermitage street

Booksellers, Bookbinders, Stationers, & Printers.

Clark Thos, Fred. Sheep market street
Pulman George, Market place

Boot & Shoe Makers.

Bishop George, Church street
Bargery Benj. Tower hill
Bargery Thomas, South street
Bragg William, West street
Chard Charles, West street
Fone John, Hermitage street
Delamont Joseph, Hermitage st
Lacey William, South street
Newick George, Sheepmarket st
Pitman Joseph, Goulds square
Scriven William, West street
Slade William, Goulds square
Webber William, South street

Brewers & Maltsters.

Budge Edwd. & Standfield William Thos. & Co. Hermitage Brewery
Jolliffe Geo. Hilborne & Norman J. Evomy, Crewkerne brewery

Cabinet Makers.

Bishop Eli, Sheep market street
Bishop John, Goulds Barton
Male Charles, West street
Perry Henry, West street
Rapson James, South street
Stembridge Thomas, Church st

Carpenters.

Bishop John, Gouldsbrook terrace
Hayward Giles, East street
Patridge Moses, Hermitage street
Peach Henry, Hermitage street
Perry Henry, West street
Rapson James, South street
Slade Thomas, Market place

Chemists and Druggists.

Galpin Walter, Market place
Pearce Joseph, Sheep market st

Chimney Sweepers.

Hunt John, Hermitage street
Hunt William, Hermitage street
Pattimore Peter, West street

China, Glass, &c. Dealers.

Jefferies Christiana, Market place
Towt Sarah, Sheepmarket street

Coopers.

Bartlett William, Tower hill
Leach Robt. Tower hill
Palmer Joseph, Sheepmarket st

Curriers.

Adam John, Goulds square
Turner William, Cornhill

Fire & Life Assurance Agents.

Atlas ( F.&L.) Templeman and Son, Church street
Clerical, Medical, & General ( L.), Galpin Walter, Market place
Great Britain ( L.), Hodge Edwd. Sheep market street
London and Provincial Law ( L.), Sparks Wm. John, East street
Merchants & Tradesmans ( L.), Foss Lewis, Sheep market street
Norwich Union ( F. & L.), Perry Robert, Sheep market street
Phoenix ( F.), Patch John, Abbey street
Standard ( L.), Pulman George, Market place
Star ( F.and L.), Clarke Sealy, Crewkerne
Sun ( F. and L.), Young John, Sheepmarket street
West of England ( F. and L.), Bicknell Wm. Cox, Market pl

Flax and Tow Spinners.

Mathews Thomas, and Mathews Thomas, jun. Popels Well
Row John Wall, North street

Girth Web Maufacturers.

Bird Robert, South street
Holman Henry, Vinney bridge
Lye William, Haselbury
Mathews Thomas, and Mathews Thomas, jun. ( and hair seating and curled hair manufacturers), Market place & Popels well
Pitt Thomas, Haselbury

Grocers and Tea Dealers.

Budge John, East street
Ewens Wm. Sheepmarket street
Galpin Walter, Market place
Horsey John, Market place
Pearce Joseph, Sheepmarket street
Young John, Sheepmarket street

Grocery and Sundries Dealers in.

Eyres James, East street
Fry Thomas, West street
Hebditch William, Market place
Holman Henry, Vinney bridge
Holman John, North street
Marsh John, Market place
Miller Charles, North street
Lacey Wm. South street
Munford James, South street
Munford John, Market place
Munford Robert, Vinney bridge
Palmer Joseph, Sheepmarket st
Pearce Thomas, North street
Raison James, West street
Scriven William, West street
Smith Charles, Goulds square
Smith Christopher, West street
Stembridge Francis, North street
Wilce John, South street

Hair Cutters.

Howe Samuel, Church street
Norman Thos. Sheepmarket street
Symonds George, North street

Inns and Public Houses.

Antelope, North st. Gusney John
Cross Keys, West street, Davis Henry
Five Bells, Church la. Brooks John
George Hotel, (commercial and posting), Market place, Marsh William
Kings Arms, Market pl Taylor Thomas
Nags Head, Market place, Wilce William
Red Lion, Sheepmarket st. Sprake William
Swan, Church street, Corner Richard
White Hart, East street, Stembridge Charles
White Lion, Hermitage street, Delamont Joseph

Ironfounder.

Hayward Giles ( and agricultural implement manufactr), East st

Ironmongers.

Ewens Wm. Sheepmarket street
Towt Sarah, Sheepmarket street
Young John, Sheepmarket street

Linen and Woollen Drapers.

Bicknell Wm.Cox, Market place
Brown Edward, Market place
Foss Lewis, Sheepmarket street
Hodge Edwd. Sheepmarket street
Palmer Thomas, Abbey street
Pendered John, East street

Millers.

Brice Charles, Dinnington mills
Farnham Robt. Clapton mills
Fowler Thomas, Haymoor mills
French Josiah, Merriot Mills
Gibbs Joseph, New place mills
Ireland John, Bury mills
Manley John, Hewish mills
Patch William, Bob mills
Read Joseph, Lopen mills
Read Richard, Merriot mills
Slade John, North perrot mills
Stembridge Thos. Misterton
Tucker Robt.C. Clapton mills

Milliners and Dressmakers.

March Elizabeth, North street
Shephard Sarah, North street
Slade Elizabeth, & Hutchings Mary Ann, Goulds barton
Stoodley and Rapson, West street
Toleman Sarah, East street

Nursery and Seedsman.

Chard James, Haselbury
Webber William, Market place

Painters.

Howe Geo. (& gilder) Church st
Hutchings John, Church street

Plasterers and Tilers.

Hillard Charles ( plasterer only) , East street
Munford John, Market place
Taylor Thomas, Market place

Plumbers and Glaziers.

Munford Jas. (& painter) South st
Munford Thomas, East street
Priddle Samuel, South street
Toleman John (& painter) East st

Rope & Twine Manufacturers.

England George, Haselbury
Withey George, & Smith George, North Perrot

Saddle and Harness Makers.

Clarke Sealey, Crewkerne
Plowman Edwd. Sheepmarket pl
Plowman Robt. Market place
Podger Edwin, South street
Willis William, East street

Sail and Cloth Manufacturers.

Ford Isaac, West Chinnock
Genge & Lovibond, East Chinnock
Hayward Richd. & Sons, West Chinnock
Randall & Son, East Chinnock
Row John Wall, North street
Templeman Thomas, Lopen

Schools.

Bull Charles, West street
Dawes Sophia (boarding), South st
Dodge Christiana, Church street
Grammar, Abbey st. (& boarding), Head master, Penney, Rev. Chas. m.a.; Second master, Sandiland, Rev. Percival R.; Third master, Howe, Thos. A. French & German master, De Witt Monsieur
Infant, West street; mistress, Willis Jane G.
Jolliffe Maria & Christiana, Sheepmarket street
Martin Henry, Gouldsbrook terr
National, West street; master, Hiorns Thomas David; mistress, Bramwell Catherine

Solicitors.

Hussey John, Abbey house
Jolliffe Jas. Hare, Sheepmarket st
Lowman Robert, Abbey street
Sparks Wm. & John, East street
Templeman John, Merriott
Templeman John Marsh, & Templeman Jno. Marsh, jun. Church street
Tidcombe John James, East st

Stay Makers.

Bull Ann, West street
March Sarah, Church street
Slade Fanny, Abbey street

Stone Masons.

Bull Humphrey, West street
Lye Thomas, Ashlands
Lye William, Goulds square

Straw Hat Makers.

Gange Christiana, Hermitage st
Stembridge Phillis, Sheepmarket st
Turner Sophia, Cornhill street

Surgeons.

Bowdage Emanuel, Abbey street
Jolliffe Geo. Hillborne, Market pl
Jolliffe George Slade, Market pl
Morse Arthur Chas. Church street
Webber John, Market place
Wells George Fredk. East street
Wills Joseph, East street

Tailors.

Bicknell Wm. Cox, & Martin Charles (& general outfitters), Market place
Clift Benjamin, Goulds square
Eyres James, East street
Haggett John, West street
Holman Edward, Tower hill
Hutchings Edward, Church street
March Thos. Taylor, Church st
Moon Thomas, Market place
Pitman John, Church path
Swaffield Henry, South street

TurnersWood.

March John, North street
March Richard, East street

Watch & Clock Makers.

Clarke Thos. Fredk. Sheepmarket street
Pearce John, Market place

Wheelwrights.

Collard James, West street
Davis Henry, West street
Hayward Giles, East street
Pitman James, Tower hill
Slade Thomas, Market place

Wine and Spirit Merchants.

Galpin Walter, Market place
Kite James, Church street

Wire Sieve Makers.

Paull Henry, South street
Paull Thomas, South street

Miscellaneous.

Architect, Allen James Mountford, Crewkerne
Berlin Wool Repository, Turner Elizabeth, Sheepmarket street
Brick and Tile Maker, Plowman Edward, North street
Butcher, Symonds Hugh, West st
Coach Builder, Standfield George, West street
Land Surveyors, Guy and Stubbs Hinton St. George
Professor of Music, Summerhayes John, Popels Well
Provision Merchant, Ewens Wm. Daniel, Gouldsbrook terrace
Sacking and Sack Manufacturers, Rendall Henry, Haselbury
Veterinary Surgeon, Blake Chas. William, East street

Law and Public Officers.

Hussey John, clerk to the commissioners of the Crewkerne turnpike roads, Abbey house.
Male Charles, town crier, West street.
Perry William, surveyor of roads, West street.
Sparks William, clerk to the trustees of the Crewkerne grammar school, and the new alms houses, East street.
Templeman John Marsh, treasurer to the commissioners of the Crewkerne turnpike roads, Church street.
Webber John, registrar of births, deaths, marriages, Market place.

Public Buildings, Offices, &c.

Alms Houses,West street, for aged people of both sexes.
County Court, Town hall, Market place; judge, John Monson Carrow; clerk, Edward Lovell; assistant clerk, John Sparks; high bailiff, Edward Charles Coles; assistant bailiff, John Lowman.
Engine House, East street. Keys at the agents for the various fire offices.
Gas Works,Gas lane; manager, John Toleman, East street.
Inland Revenu Officer,Swan Inn, Church street; officer, Edwin Restarick
Scientific and Literary Institution,Town hall; treasurer, William Thomas Standfield; secretary, Joseph Pearce.
Stamp Office,Market place; sub distributor, Walter Galpin.
Town Hall,Market place; keeper, William Sparks.

coachesto

Bridport.Royal Mail, from the George hotel, daily, at 4 30 p.m.
Taunton. Royal Mail, from the George hotel, daily, at 9 30 a.m. and Prince Albert, daily from the same inn, at 12 30 p.m.
Weymouth. Prince Albert, from the George inn, daily, at 4 30 p.m.

waggonsto

Bridport and Bristol.Ford & Co., from the Swan inn, Tues. Thurs. and Sat. at 9 a.m.
Chard.Ford & Co., Mon. Thurs. & Sat. at 9 a.m.
London, Bristol,and all parts. Crocker, from the white Hart, and Ford & Co., from Swann inn, both daily.

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Stembridge Links

The following is a list of various Stembridge Links that I’ve found on the web. Found any not listed? (use contact me above)

United States STEMBRIDGES:

Overseas STEMBRIDGES:

LINKS to STEMBRIDGE related:

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Clara Idella Stembridge 1874-1904

Photo of stained glass window at First United Methodist Church of Milledgeville, Ga.
photo coutesty my Dad, Roger E. Stembridge!

Home Again

Date: Sep 23, 2003

from: Dr. Roger Stembridge

“… Moore’s Funeral Home finally got Grandmother Clara Idella
Stembridge moved from the farm location to Memory Hill in
Milledgeville. Also little G. M. was moved although they said they could find nothing in his grave. Only part of a skull and part of a leg bone was all they found of Grandmother. Both were placed into a child’s vault and buried at the foot of Grandfather. Asbury Stembridge has slabs prepared to place over two plots. Grandmother at the foot of Grandfather and G. M at the foot of Grandmother Sarah. After Asbury has the slabs in place, we will plan a dedication service.”

Memory Hill Cemetary in 1897

Memory Hill Cemetary in 2001

Photos from Memory Hill Cemetary, Milledegeville, Georgia


Date: Mon, 17 Sep 2001

from: Dr. Roger Stembridge

“As everyone knows, our grandmother Clara was discovered to be buried in the J. E. Stembridge Cemetery off Ebony Lounge Road off Hwy 24 off Hwy 22 in Baldwin County. I have had two people to tell me they have been to the cemetery. One had promised to take me there but we could never seem to get together. The second one was there a few days ago and wrote very explicit directions how to fine the cemetery.

This morning, I decided to try to find it. Following Glen’s
directions I walked right to it. I was awesome to see her grave and the grave of Little G. M. Stembridge (about a year and a half old).

Both graves are in poor condition with Little G. M.’s headstone broken and laying down. The slabs (I think concrete) over the graves are intact but have sheaved off and look terrible. Both are covered with rotted leaves and growth. There is a flower pot on Clara’s grave that Glen says was put there sometime during the past 15 years (the best he can remember when he last saw the grave before this time).”


Ebony Lounge Road is now subdivided and there are doublewide homes up and down the road, but the cemetery is a good ways from the Ebony Lounge Road behind the south side of the road. It looks like some surveying has taken place in recent months and some clearing done not too far from the cemetery.

If any of you are down at any time, I will be glad to take you out to see the site. Other than that, I will at some time make some effort to clean up the site and the headstones so that the inscriptions can be read. I could read most of the letters but I think a good cleaning will improve readability. One of the attached pictures is a close-up of Clara’s headstone. The other is an overall picture of her grave.

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